Hazard (West Hell Magic #1) by Devon Monk

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Random Hazard has a stupid name and a terrible secret: he’s a wizard.

Wizards aren’t allowed to play in the NHL, but Random Hazard will do anything for a chance to play pro hockey. When his teammate is about to get brained by a puck going fast enough to kill, Random has no choice but to use magic.

Yes, he saved the guy’s life, but he destroyed his own.

Kicked out of the NHL, the only thing left for him is West Hell, a freak league of shifters and drifters more blood sport than hockey.

Being the first wizard in a league full of monsters might get him killed. Or it just might finally prove that magic and hockey do mix...

Pet’s $0.02

Hot men, cold ice and shifters.

It seems like this might just be tailor made for me.

Devon Monk is an artist at building worlds that feel incredibly natural. You don’t question all the little weird details, they just are. So, it makes perfect sense that you have large cat and canine shifters, as well as the occasional oddity thrown in, and wizards who have their own hockey league.

There is something incredibly sad about Random’s past. I was torn between feeling sorry for him for losing has much as he did, at a young age, or feeling happy for him that he had Duncan’s family. They took him in as one of their own when Random’s mother took off. You can’t get much better than Duncan as an adopted brother and Duncan’s parents are pretty much perfect.

For a society that seems to have embraced the idea of shifters in their midst, I was surprised that they gave Random such a hard time. But, people mistrust what they don’t understand and since Random has been hiding his magic his entire life, he doesn’t understand it either, so everyone’s in the dark around what Roman can and can’t do.

In West Hell, the skating is intense, the rivalries are violent and the only reason anyone goes to watch them is for the fights. But, if you act fast, you can get in on the action when everything is new and you can follow the team from the beginning.

 

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